PhotoOp: “Unshot New York"

Photos of places in New York that even the locals don't know about...

New York City is renown for its incredible photo opportunities - from The Top of the Rock to Brooklyn Bridge via Times Square and Grand Central. Magnificent, busy and unapologetic, it's New York through and through. 

Or is it?

PhotoOp wants to shine a light on some other, less celebrated New York photos spots. 

Definitely not tourist-magnets; but perhaps attractive to those photographers who want to shoot something more unique. And perhaps, more real...

El Sabroso - shot by Michelle Young

El Sabroso - shot by Michelle Young

El Sabroso

Not quite the secret it once was, El Sabroso is still unknown to many. The Latina restaurant is a true hole-in-the-wall eatery, hidden inside the freight entrance of a non-descript building in the Garment District. Street photographers can expect real slice-of-life New York, as locals grab their lunchtime fare, skipping past laden delivery carts on their way in and out of the building.

Eldridge Street Synagogue

Eldridge Street Synagogue

Eldridge Street Synagogue

The Eldridge Street Synagogue was just another victim of the Great Depression until an $18.5 million restoration gave it a new lease of life in 2007. It's an incredibly moody space that draws on Gothic, Romanesque and Moorish architectural influences, with complex and competing lines that many photographers will love exploring.

A wall by How and Nowsm -shot by Eric Lau

A wall by How and Nowsm -shot by Eric Lau

The Bronx - a Street Art Walkabout

Not so much a single destination, as an exploration. From Whitlock Avenue to Drake Avenue via Hunts Point, the streets are filled with incredible artwork from some of the top street artists around. The designs are powerful and provocative, providing cultural reflections and challenges that many photographers would love the opportunity to document.

Dead Horse Bay - shot by Evan Simon

Dead Horse Bay - shot by Evan Simon

Dead Horse Bay

Hidden behind a bus-stop in the the southwestern corner of Brooklyn, the enterprising landscape photographer will find an unmarked path that leads to a beach like no-other, and certainly not a scene you would associate with New York City. It's almost post-apocalyptic.

The name dates back to the mid-19th century when the area was the final destination for the city's carriage horses. Arriving by barge, the animals were transported to rendering plants to make glue or fertilizer - with the bits that were deemed unusable chucked unceremoniously into the harbor. Over time it became a more universal dumping ground for the city's trash. Today, as the soil of the manmade harbor is gradually washed away by the tide, more and more debris reveals itself, with the vast majority dating back to the 1930s and 1940s.

Great Hall - shot by Larry Lederman

Great Hall - shot by Larry Lederman

Cunard Building

As others jostle and shove to get a shot of the Wall Street Bull, you may want to quietly cross the road and slip into 20 Broadway. Walking through the entrance you will find the great hall - a room that some say rivals the splendor of Grand Central. The walls and vaulted ceilings are adorned with breathtaking maritime imagery from when the building originally served as the Cunard Steamship Line ticketing office in 1900's.

The Kingston Lounge - shot by Richard Nickel, Jr

The Kingston Lounge - shot by Richard Nickel, Jr

North Brother Island

This one is a bit of an outlier. While we're definitely not recommending you go here (since it's not legal), we still think it is worth sharing. Quite a few "urban explorers" have made the pilgrimage to North Brother Island over the years, capturing the conflict between nature and man as the greenery slowly takes over the buildings and streets. 

Inside the Hell Gate section of the East River, the island houses an eery old quarantine hospital that was once the site of an experimental drug treatment program...

Check out more pictures here.

Where else would you recommend photographers go, if they're looking to shoot New York City from a different perspective?